Here is a selection of Karen Dombrowski-Sobel's photographs of the Long Island homes built by José Allegue.

Click the images to view larger versions.

West_detail

The West Residence, Hewlett Bay Park, 1949

This elegant lamp, incorporated into the door surround, is a fine demonstration of John Finn's design skills, but it says even more of Allegue's craftsmanship with the finely shaped moldings and correct interpretation of the designer Finn's work. Finn and Allegue often collaborated.

   
Goldberger_detail

The Goldberger Residence, Hewlett Bay Park, 1953

One of the most typical details of any Allegue house is the presence of a small cupola and, often, a dovecote. This detail of the garage of the Goldberger residence shows how Allegue employed these devices to charming effect.

   
Perlbinder_elev_overall

The Perlbinder Residence, Hewlett Bay Park, 1950

The main elevation of the Perlbinder residence, as seen from Meadowview Drive, rests comfortably atop a small rise and is well integrated into the landscape.

Perlbinder_elev_entry This detailed view of the entry shows the Palladian window above the front door that lights the entry hall seen here below. To the right is the bay window of the dining room.
Perlbinder_int Lastly, this interior view shows the stair rising from the entry hall, past the Palladian window and up to the second floor of the house. It has a curved plaster ceiling and a finely executed wood staircase. In the Perlbinder House, Allegue had the opportunity to exercise his craft to the highest degree in difficult finishes and details.
   
Greenberg_elev_overall

The Greenberg Residence, Hewlett Bay Park, 1947

The Greenberg Residence was Allegue's first major commission and, located prominently near the entry of Hewlett Bay Park, was no doubt good advertisement. This overall view of the house shows the long, stepped roof forms that would become typical of the Allegue style.

Greenberg_elev_entry

This detail of the entry of the Greenberg Residence shows a similar composition to the later Perlbinder Residence, with the paired gable ends used to compositionally order the front door and the bay window for the dining room, seen to the left.